ed livingston jama podcast

Since the tweet has been deleted, it is partially written as follows. It didn’t go as planned. James Ladara, MD, the CEO and EVP of the American Medical Association, released a statement on Wednesday announcing more fallout from the podcast. The podcast and JAMA’s tweet promoting were widely criticized on Twitter. Ed Livingston: Practicing surgeon and Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA. Now, he is persona non grata. In the apology, Dr. Bauchner stated that “racism and structural racism exist in the U.S. and in health care.”. March 4, 2021 -- A 16-minute podcast from JAMA: TheJournal of the American Medical Association that attempts to discuss structural racism in the U.S. health car.. An explanation of the idea by doctors for doctors in this user-friendly podcast from the great [Mitchell Katz] and [Ed Livingston].” The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. Many people like myself are offended by the implication that we are somehow racist.” ... — JAMA (@JAMA_current) March 4, 2021. AMA, JAMA. The debate stems from a Feb. 24 podcast on the JAMA Network in which deputy editor Ed Livingston said there is no systemic racism in the U.S. anymore. .. .. JAMA is one of the world’s leading medical journals, publishing research that shapes the scientific agenda and public policy around the globe. June 1, 2021 -- Howard Bauchner, MD, will step down as editor-in-chief of JAMA, the journal of the American. 'The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitchell Katz has been withdrawn,' Bauchner says in the clip. Bouchner posted an audio clip of less than a minute in which he apologized. The best path forward for the JAMA Network, and for me personally, is to create an opportunity for new leadership at JAMA,” he said. As a child of the '60s, I didn't get it," said podcast host Ed Livingston, JAMA's deputy editor for clinical reviews and education, in introducing the topic. Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA. Howard Bauchner, MD, will step down as editor-in-chief of JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association — one of the most widely circulated medical journals in the […] Many of us are offended by the concept that we are racist.” Then, on June 1, JAMA … On Feb. 24, deputy editor Ed Livingston hosted a 16-minute podcast on the JAMA Network, “Structural Racism for Doctors — What Is It?” where … Does anyone care about the truth when a … The firestorm began on Feb. 24, when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor who is white, said on a podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. JAMA is without doubt one of the world’s main medical journals, publishing analysis that shapes the scientific agenda and public coverage across the globe. A JAMA Network podcast on structural racism and a tweet that began with, ... Ed Livingston, MD, saying things like: “what you're talking about isn't so much racism...it isn't their race, it … On the JAMA Network web site where the podcast was posted, the episode was pulled. O vice-editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argumentou em um JAMA podcast que o racismo estrutural não existe mais nos Estados Unidos ou no campo da medicina. Bauchner posted an audio clip less than a minute long in which he apologized. Intro – From the JAMA Network, this is JAMA Clinical Reviews, interviews and ideas about innovations in medicine, science and clinical practice. Bauchner, who had led JAMA since 2011, had been on administrative leave since March because of an ongoing investigation into comments made on the journal’s podcast. JAMA, what doctors call the AMA’s journal, featured a conversation about structural racism between—get this to middle aged white doctors—Ed Livingston JAMA’s Deputy Editor for Clinical Content, and Mitchell Katz, Editor at JAMA’s Internal Medicine-focused journal and CEO of the New York Public Hospital System. In the podcast, Livingston and Katz speak about health care disparities and racial inequality. Speaking of seats at the table, the two people who appeared on the podcast on “structural racism” were the host, Ed Livingston, MD, the Deputy Editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and the guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine. Podcast: Structural Racism for Doctors – What is it? JAMA removed the podcast earlier this month and Bauchner issued an apology. JAMA clinical reviews 2/23/2021. In the podcast, Livingston held a discussion on race … JAMA, what doctors call the AMA’s journal, featured a conversation about structural racism between—get this to middle aged white doctors—Ed Livingston JAMA’s Deputy Editor for Clinical Content, and Mitchell Katz, Editor at JAMA’s Internal Medicine-focused journal and CEO of the New York Public Hospital System. Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. The podcast episode’s troubles started with a tweet, now deleted, from JAMA that linked to the episode. March 4, 2021-16-minute podcast from Jama:Journal of American Medical Association Attempts to discuss structural racism in the US healthcare system have sparked social media conversations about the handling and promotion of episodes. “Structural racism is an unfortunate term,” said deputy editor Dr. Ed Livingston during a Feb. 24 podcast. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. The episode featured host Ed Livingston, MD, who was then the deputy editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals, and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine. Michael Harriot, writing for The Root, provides the details of the now deleted podcast by two physicians, editors for the Journal of the American Medical Association [JAMA… JAMA then promoted the podcast on social media by writing, "No physician is racist, so how can there be structural racism in health care?" The podcast’s host Ed Livingston, previously JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical reviews and education, told MedPage Today, “Structural racism is an unfortunate term.Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. ... JAMA deputy editor Ed Livingston … Those statements were “wrong, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. JAMA Podcast Transcript. The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitch Katz has been withdrawn. “The podcast on structural racism has been withdrawn based on discussions between Dr. Ed Livingston and Dr. Michelle Katz,” Boucher says in the clip. Here’s your host: Ed Livingston. “Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitch Katz has been withdrawn. Listen on Apple Podcasts. 0:00 / 0:00. Listen on Apple Podcasts. JAMA Clinical Reviews. This is 16-minute nonsense that ignores the full proof foundation on racism (including papers printed by JAMA). The controversy began when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, said on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. Those statements were “wrong, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. That tweet has since been deleted. The episode features host Ed Livingston, MD, the deputy editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine. Bauchner had been on administrative leave while a review of a JAMA podcast and tweet about structural racism in medicine was ongoing. The podcast’s host Ed Livingston, previously JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical reviews and education, told MedPage Today, “Structural racism is an unfortunate term.Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. On Feb. 24, deputy editor Ed Livingston hosted a 16-minute podcast on the JAMA Network, “Structural Racism for Doctors — What Is It?” where he argued that medical racism was no longer an issue. June 1, 2021 -- Howard Bauchner, MD, will step down as editor-in-chief of JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Affiliation -- some of the extensively . From the JAMA Network, this is JAMA Performance Improvement: Do No Harm, the podcast about performance improvement and medicine that aims to elevate the quality of care, one patient at a time, with host Ed Livingston, MD. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism not exists in the US or within the area of drugs. Howard Bauchner, the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), was placed on administrative leave on March 25 after a staff member made controversial comments about racism in medicine during a podcast.. During the February 24 podcast, Deputy Editor Ed Livingston said that structural racism no longer existed in the U.S. Transcript: This is Dr Howard Bauchner, Editor in Chief of JAMA and the JAMA Network. The podcast featured two white physicians — JAMA deputy editor Ed Livingston and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine, president and CEO of … JAMA is one of the world’s leading medical journals, publishing research that shapes the scientific agenda and public policy around the globe. Here’s your host: Ed Livingston. Bouchner posted an audio clip of less than a minute in which he apologized. The controversy began when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, said on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. The controversy began when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, said on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United … The firestorm began on Feb. 24, when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor who is white, said on a podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. Earlier this year, Dr. Edward Livingston, then JAMA’s deputy editor, said in a since-deleted JAMA Network podcast that “Structural racism is an unfortunate term. ... 'Structural racism is an unfortunate term,' said Dr Ed Livingston, the deputy editor, said on the podcast. Many people like myself are offended by the implication that we are somehow racist," deputy editor Dr. Ed Livingston said on the podcast. “The podcast on structural racism has been withdrawn based on discussions between Dr. Ed Livingston and Dr. Michelle Katz,” Boucher says in the clip. Racism and structural racism exist in … AMA, JAMA. JAMA Editor-in-Chief Howard Bauchner, MD, issued an apology to JAMA stakeholders and staff, many of whom said they were offended and outraged by the events. Interviewer Ed Livingston - This is the third and final instalment of my recent interview with Dr Mitch Katz, the president and CEO of New York City Health and Hospitals. The podcast is on JAMA Clinical Evaluate. JAMA is likely one of the world’s main medical journals, publishing analysis that shapes the scientific agenda and public coverage across the globe. The answer, they promised, was in JAMA’s “user-friendly podcast,” a 15-minute conversation between two (white) physicians, host Ed Livingston and guest Mitchell Katz, editors in the JAMA network of journals. JAMA is one of the world’s leading medical journals, publishing research that shapes the scientific agenda and public policy around the globe. During the podcast, JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical content, Ed Livingston, and editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals, Mitchell Katz, stated racism was “illegal,” therefore suggesting it couldn’t be explicitly embedded in society. The episode options host Ed Livingston, MD, the deputy editor for medical opinions and training at JAMA, and visitor Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Well being + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Inner Medication. DEC 22, 2020. The February podcast involved two white doctors — Ed Livingston, JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical content, and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals — who are not experts in structural racism, broadcasting a conversation about that topic on JAMA’s huge and powerful platform that came across as deeply offensive. The February podcast involved two white doctors — Ed Livingston, JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical content, and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals — who are not experts in structural racism, broadcasting a conversation about that topic on JAMA’s huge and powerful platform that came across as deeply offensive. Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA. Those statements were "wrong, misguided and uninformed," JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. Those statements were "wrong, misguided and uninformed," JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. Following a flood of criticism, the journal removed the podcast and deleted the tweet, and Livingston subsequently resigned. During a Feb. 24 podcast episode produced on the JAMA Network, deputy editor Ed Livingston said structural racism no longer existed in the United States. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. Shakeup Highlights Divide in Medicine. Gordon Guyatt, MD, is a Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics at McMaster University.He has published more than 950 peer-reviewed papers, of which more than 130 have appeared in JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, Annals of Internal Medicine, and New England Journal of Medicine; his work has been cited over 70 000 times.Dr Guyatt coined the term "evidence-based … ... JAMA deputy editor Ed Livingston … “Structural racism is … It all started in February when Dr. Ed Livingston, a JAMA deputy editor who is white, stated in a podcast that structural racism was no longer a problem in the United States. “Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA,” Dr. Bauchner said in a statement. “We are instituting changes that will address and prevent such failures from happening again.” Dr. Livingston later resigned. "Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. Until last week, Dr. Edward Livingston was a celebrated academic, known for his compassion and for being a wise hand at difficult topics.He was the deputy editor of Journal of the American Medical Association- the AMA's scientific and scholarly arm and host of its successful JAMA Clinical Reviews podcast. In today’s JAMA Clinical Reviews podcast we discuss structural racism for sceptics. “Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. “Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. Explanation of ideas for doctors by doctors. The episode featured host Ed Livingston, MD, who was then the deputy editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals, and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. From the JAMA Network, this is JAMA Performance Improvement: Do No Harm, the podcast about performance improvement and medicine that aims to elevate the quality of care, one patient at a time, with host Ed Livingston, MD. … From the JAMA Network, this is JAMA Professionalism: Best Practice, the podcast about medical professionalism that examines difficult situations and prepares clinicians for the unexpected challenges of medical practice, with host Edward Livingston, MD. During the podcast episode that aired Feb. 24, deputy editor Ed Livingston said structural racism no longer existed in the United States. On February 24, the Twitter account for the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) shared a link to a podcast discussion between Edward Livingston and Mitchell Katz, two white physicians. TUESDAY, June 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Because of controversial statements about racism made by a staff member, the editor-in-chief of JAMA and JAMA Network will step down on June 30, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Tuesday.. Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA's chief since 2011, has been on administrative leave due to a JAMA podcast and tweet about structural racism in … Publish date: March 11, 2021. This is Dr Howard Bauchner, Editor in Chief of JAMA and the JAMA Network. In the February 23 podcast episode, also since taken down, host Ed Livingston, then JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical reviews and education, said, “Structural racism is an unfortunate term,” according to MedPage Today. The episode features host Ed Livingston, MD, the deputy editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine. About a week and a wave of backlash later, JAMA Editor-in-Chief Dr. Howard Bauchner issued a statement saying the podcast and tweet had been deleted, calling Dr. Livingston… "Structural racism is an unfortunate term," said Livingston. The controversy began when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, said on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. JAMA then promoted the podcast … The AMA has openly criticized the 16-minute podcast from JAMA, aired February 23, that attempted to discuss structural racism in the US healthcare system.. Lindsay Kalter. 'The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitchell Katz has been withdrawn,' Bauchner says in the clip. A February podcast on structural racism — which led to the resignation of two top-level editors … JAMA is one of the world’s leading medical journals, publishing research that shapes the scientific agenda and public policy around the globe. Racism and structural racism exist in the U.S. and in … The deputy editor, Ed Livingston, M.D., argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. The controversy started when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, mentioned on a Feb. 24 podcast that … "Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. Bauchner held the … March 4, 2021 — A 16-minute podcast from JAMA: TheJournal of the American Medical Affiliation that makes an attempt to debate structural racism within the U.S. well being care system has stirred dialog on social media concerning the dealing with and promotion of the episode.. These statements have been “mistaken, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA mentioned in an editorial printed on-line June three. Bauchner had been on administrative leave while a review of a JAMA podcast and tweet about structural racism in medicine was ongoing. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. During the podcast episode titled “Structural Racism for Doctors — What Is It?” Dr. Ed Livingston suggested the disparity of medical care between Black … Those statements were "wrong, misguided and uninformed," JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. In March, MedPage Today reported that in the since-deleted episode, Edward Livingston, then the deputy editor at JAMA, said that "[s]tructural racism is an unfortunate term. A February podcast on structural racism — which led to the resignation of two top-level editors at the widely circulated Journal of the American Medical Association […] JAMA is a leading peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original research, reviews and editorials 48 times a year. The episode options host Ed Livingston, MD, the deputy editor for medical opinions and training at JAMA, and visitor Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Well being + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Inner Medication. Dr. Livingston later resigned. On Thursday night, officials at JAMA did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Many in the medical community said that the journal had not gone far enough and that the events offered an opportunity to make more systemic changes. “Edward H. Livingston, MD, has resigned as deputy editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) after he and the journal faced significant backlash over a February podcast that questioned the existence of structural racism.” JAMA editor resigns over controversial podcast. The decision comes after JAMA's deputy editor, Ed Livingston, MD, dismissed structural racism in a Feb. 24 podcast episode later promoted on the journal's Twitter account. A February podcast on structural racism — which led to the resignation of two top-level editors … In today’s JAMA Clinical Reviews podcast we discuss structural racism for sceptics. Dr. Phil Fontanarosa, JAMA’s executive director, will serve as interim editor in chief until a new editor is named. The February podcast involved two white doctors — Ed Livingston, JAMA's deputy editor for clinical content, and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals — who are not experts in structural racism, broadcasting a conversation about that topic on JAMA’s huge and powerful platform that came across as deeply offensive. The controversy started when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, stated on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism not existed in the US. WORD DOCUMENT TO DOWNLOAD HERE . Edward H. Livingston, MD, has resigned as deputy editor of JAMA after he and the journal faced significant backlash over a February 2021 podcast that questioned the existence of structural racism. On jama network The web site where the podcast was posted pulled the episode. Many of us are offended by the concept that we are racist.” Bauchner was placed on administrative leave following a February JAMA Network podcast that questioned whether there is structural racism in healthcare. Comments made in the podcast … Edward Livingston, a deputy editor of JAMA who took part in the podcast, was forced to resign. We have heard from many in our physician community and beyond this past week who expressed anger, hurt, frustration and concern about a harmful podcast that was posted on the JAMA Network™ and the AMA Ed Hub™, along … 1x. It read, “No physician is racist, so how can there be structural racism in health care? Shakeup Highlights Divide in Medicine. In the February 24th podcast episode, he has hosted Ed Livingston since it was also removed, and then JAMA“Structural racism is an unfortunate term,” said Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Review and Education. The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. Essas declarações foram "erradas, mal orientadas e desinformadas", JAMA disse em um editorial publicado online em 3 de junho. Those statements were “wrong, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. The controversy began when Dr. Ed Livingston, a deputy editor, said on a Feb. 24 podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States. In late February 2021, JAMA released a podcast by two of the journal’s editors, Ed Livingston and Mitchell Katz, that was ostensibly meant to … In February, Dr. Ed Livingston, a white, deputy JAMA editor, said during the podcast that structural racism no longer existed in the United States, according to … Those statements were “wrong, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. In conjunction with the podcast, the journal released a tweet that read, "No physician is racist, so how can there be structural racism in health care?" Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA. 4.4 • 23 Ratings. Intro – From the JAMA Network, this is JAMA Clinical Reviews, interviews and ideas about innovations in medicine, science and clinical practice. The February podcast involved two white doctors — Ed Livingston, JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical content, and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of … Transcript by Rachel Buckle on 17th March 2021, using the verbatim format. The title was ‘Structural Racism for Doctors – What is it?’. The controversy began when Deputy Editor-in-Chief Dr. Ed Livingston stated in a February 24 podcast that structural racism no … The deputy editor, Dr. Ed Livingston, argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. TUESDAY, June 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Because of controversial statements about racism made by a staff member, the editor-in-chief of JAMA and JAMA Network will step down on June 30, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Tuesday.. Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA's chief since 2011, has been on administrative leave due to a JAMA podcast and tweet about structural … Livingston… Many people like myself are offended by the implication that we are somehow racist," deputy editor Dr. Ed Livingston said on the podcast. The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitchell Katz has been withdrawn. JAMA podcast on racism in medicine faces backlash. JAMA's reckoning came in response to a podcast discussion in which Dr. Edward Livingston, an editor, suggested "removing racism from the conversation" about societal inequities, stating that "structural racism is an unfortunate term for a very real problem." By. Bauchner posted an audio clip less than a minute long in which he apologized. The deputy editor, Ed Livingston, M.D., argued in a JAMA podcast that structural racism no longer exists in the United States or in the field of medicine. The podcast was intended as an explanation of “structural racism for skeptics.” That’s how Livingston framed his 15-minute talk with Mitchell Katz, who leads New York City’s public healthcare system and also serves as an editor at a JAMA journal. “Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. T. It all started in February when Dr. Ed Livingston, a JAMA deputy editor who is White, stated in a podcast that structural racism was no longer a problem in the United States. Bauchner’s departure comes months after two editors of JAMA journals suggested in a podcast that structural racism does not exist in medicine. Find someone like Ed Livingston “ JAMA podcasts for reviews and education were really good, for the most part because of the value added by Dr. Livingston - his outstanding skills in presentation, sound, and the way he asked questions (mirrored what of the listener). In the February 23 podcast episode, also since taken down, host Ed Livingston, then JAMA’s deputy editor for clinical reviews and education, said, “Structural racism is an unfortunate term,” according to MedPage Today. The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitch Katz has been withdrawn. Howard Bauchner, the editor in chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association ( JAMA ), was placed on administrative leave last week (25 March) after controversy over a podcast on racism in medicine hosted by deputy editor Ed Livingston.1 The podcast has been withdrawn, Livingston has resigned, and Bauchner posted an apology online.2 He said, “Comments made in the podcast … Now the esteemed Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has fired podcast host and deputy editor Dr. Edward Livingston, who raised his own concerns and doubts in a podcast over claims of structural racism. Those statements were “wrong, misguided and uninformed,” JAMA said in an editorial published online June 3. The episode features host Ed Livingston, MD, the deputy editor for clinical reviews and education at JAMA, and guest Mitchell Katz, MD, the president and CEO for NYC Health + Hospitals and deputy editor for JAMA Internal Medicine.

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